Canning Myths

Myth #1 – Cans Affect Flavor

Modern cans are lined with a water-based polymer that keeps the contents from contacting the metal and preserving the brewery fresh taste. Think of it as a mini-keg for the beer. You don’t drink craft beer from the keg, or a bottle; you drink it from a glass.

Think cans ruin the taste? Heather John, writing for Bon Appetite, reports on the benefits of the can in “The Beer Can Revolution,”, Heather John, January, 2010. See the article at

Myth#2 – Cans must be ordered in huge lots

Because of our supplier agreements, Mobile West Canning can provide cans in lots from a few thousand to a few hundred thousand (or more), and they can be pre-printed, custom labeled, or blanks that you label yourself.

Myth#3 – Good beer does not come in cans

Sierra Nevada. Oskar Blues. Ballast Point. Maui Brewing Co. Avery. Samuel Adams. Caldera Brewing Co. Anderson Valley Brewing Co. 21st Amendment Brewery. Pizza Port Brewing Co. New Belgium Brewing Co. Hangar 24 Craft Brewery. Kona Brewing Co.  and growing! See for more excellent craft brews in cans.

Maui Brewing Co.’s canned Coconut Porter became the first canned beer winner of The Washington Post’s annual “Beer Madness” competition in 2010. (“Beer Madness, Final Round: Our first canned champ” Washington Post, Greg Kitsock, April 10, 2012. See the article at

Myth#4 – Bottled beer is better than canned beer
FACT: Nothing maintains freshness as well as a can 

For decades, glass bottles were reserved for the privileged class of the beer-drinking world, while proletariats drank beer from a can. Nowadays, as most craft beer consumers have surely noticed, that trend is changing, albeit slowly.

“The extremely important paradigm shift in the choice of vessel for our hop-blessed hooch can be summed up with a simple mathematical equation: Beer + sun = skunk. The same ultraviolet rays that give you a farmer’s tan also harm unprotected beer. To paraphrase Baz Luhrmann’s epic ‘The Sunscreen Song’ — ladies and gentlemen of the internet, drink canned beer. If I could offer you only one tip for the future, cans would be it.” — Michael Arp, writer, The Blue Collar Foodie (Fair Lawn, New Jersey)